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Act II, Scene IV of William Shakespeare's King Lear

it clear that his need for his retinue does not stem from physical need, but rather is a symbolic of his status in life, his autho...

Murder Aftermath Scene Act II, Scenes ii and iii Analysis in Macbeth

In a paper consisting of five pages the revelations contained in the scenes after King Duncan's death regarding character relation...

Analysis of Act IV, Scene ii of Macbeth by William Shakespeare

cistern of my lust, and my desire / all continent impediments would oerbear...better Macbeth/ Than such an one to reign" (lines 62...

Act III, Scene 4 of King Lear by William Shakespeare

psychologist points out that Edgar discusses his own case lucidly, while indulging in unlimited incoherence in regards to everythi...

'Closet Scene' of Hamlet and New Historicist Criticism

prior to and following the death of Elizabeth I (Kelly and Kelly 677). Through certain key scenes in Hamlet, Greenblatt contends ...

Hamlet by William Shakespeare and Interpreting Ophelia's Madness in the Fourth Act, Fifth Scene 3 Different Ways

In nine pages this paper examines how Victorian theater actress Helena Faucit, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov, and Shakespear...

'The Play's the Thing': Analyzing Six Passages from William Shakespeare's Plays

Analysis of William Shakespeare's Hamlet (Act V, Scene ii), As You Like It (Act II, Scene vii), Richard III (Act I, Scene ii), The...

'What is Man?' and William Shakespeare's King Lear

In four pages the question regarding the nature of man is examined within the context of William Shakespeare's King Lear....

Macbeth by William Shakespeare and the Staging of the Witches' Scenes

the scenes involving the witches are accompanied by loud claps of thunder. Staging Macbeth outdoors gave Shakespeare natural soun...

As You Like It by William Shakespeare and the Forest of Arden

observer, the forest is depicted as a pastoral or golden world not unlike the biblical garden of Eden in two particular scenes, in...

Portia's Presentation in the Third and Fourth Acts of The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

/ Is an unlessond girl, unschoold, unpractisd; / Happy in this, she is not yet so old / But she may learn; happier than this, / Sh...

Relationship Between Henry IV and Prince Hal

that he has mercy as well as wisdom. None of this his father sees. King Henry IV tells his son in scene ii, Act III, that familia...

Ophelia in Hamlet by William Shakespeare

sign of madness was, in reality, a genuine declaration of affection. Ophelia is the only character with whom Hamlet can, at least...

Scenes of Richard III by William Shakespeare Analyzed

In 10 pages pivotal scenes including the second scene of the first act, the first scene of the second act, the first scene of the ...

Bard's Personality as Reflected in His Plays

were specifically constructed to entertain royalty, it was the impassioned actions of his characters that leave little doubt that ...

William Shakespeare's 'Absent' Mothers in Six Plays

"What, will you not suffer me? Nay, now I see / She is your treasure, she must have a husband; / I must dance bare-foot on her we...

Analyzing King Henry's Statement to Prince Hal in III.iii 93-96 of Henry IV, Part One by William Shakespeare

Hal was more interested in the gossip at the local taverns than he was in matters of state. Henry IVs cousin, Richard, who became...

William Shakespeare's King Lear and Dante's 'Inferno' Compared

leaves Cordelia dowerless. As luck or providence would have it, through a twist of fate, Cordelia became the queen of France. Go...

William Shakespeare's King Lear and Love

In ten pages this paper analyzes unconditional and conditional love as it is featured in King Lear by William Shakespeare with the...

Hamlet by William Shakespeare and the Function of Ophelia's Character

In five pages this paper discusses the play's second scene in Act II and the first scene in Act III in a consideration of the func...

Insanity of King Lear

enter the hovel, stating that he will pray and then sleep. Lear then prays for all the people who do not have shelter on this nigh...

Act III, Scene 2 of Henry IV, Part One by William Shakespeare

Hal will give his full allegiance (Grossman 170). While the audience undoubtedly realizes, since the plot is drawn from English h...

Closely Reading Ophelia's 'Mad' Songs in William Shakespeare's Hamlet Act IV, Scene V

where hours were spent singing songs and learning nursery rhymes. When Gertrude inquires as to how she is doing, Ophelia sings, "...

Lear's Life Lessons in William Shakespeare's King Lear

Money, wealth, and power are not the only things in life. He realizes that too late, but he does realize. Lear completes a spiri...

Hamlet, Act IV Soliloquy

He says, "What is a man,/If his chief good and market of this time/Be but to sleep and feed? a beast no more" (IV.IV.33-35). But w...

King Lear and Henry VIII in A Man for All Seasons

In five pages this paper examines the King's role in Robert Bolt's A Man for All Seasons and William Shakespeare's King Lear. The...

Double Plot Analysis of William Shakespeare's King Lear

In five pages the dual plots that propel the action of King Lear by William Shakespeare, those of Lear and his daughters and Glouc...

Banquet Scene in Macbeth by William Shakespeare

In six pages this essay analyzes the infamous 'banquet scene' in Act III, Scene iv of Hamlet in terms of what it reveals about Mac...

Blindness of Shakespeare Characters Gloucester, King Lear, and Othello

jealousy. His inherent nature does not want him to believe such lies. We see this throughout the story as he is constantly confuse...

'Soldier of Love' Richard III in Act I, Scene ii of William Shakespeare's Play

for the deaths of her husband, Edward V, and her father, Henry VI. Nevertheless, he demonstrates himself as quite capable in prov...